S G mark on glass containers – Saint-Gobain / Verallia

  “S G” mark on recent/modern glass containers  (2000-to date)

   Saint-Gobain Containers, 
Muncie, Indiana  (head office), known (as of 2010) as Verallia North America.    NOTE: Verallia North America (VNA) has officially been acquired by the Ardagh Group (based in Luxembourg) as of April, 2014. 

This mark dates from the year 2000 to the present (as of 2014). The ” SG” mark is seen embossed on many of their modern jars and bottles, usually on the lower heel area of the container, but sometimes on the base.  I have been told that Verallia will continue to use the “SG” mark on their glass containers even though the “official” company name was changed.
This concern was formed when Ball Corporation and Saint-Gobain (SG also acquiring Foster-Forbes Glass at that time) merged in 1995 to form Ball-Foster.  In the year 2000, the name was changed from Ball-Foster to Saint-Gobain Containers.

SG mark - Saint-Gobain Containers / Verallia North America

SG mark on “heel” of 16-oz packer jar- Saint-Gobain Containers / Verallia North America

Saint-Gobain Containers/ Verallia  is a subsidiary of Saint-Gobain, France, a huge firm with a corporate history involved with glassmaking that goes back over 300 years. Saint-Gobain has diversified and expanded it’s range of products greatly over the last few years, so glass container manufacturing is just one important component of their enterprise. They are the “number two” producer of glass containers worldwide, after Owens-Illinois, Inc.

Verallia now includes 13 glass manufacturing plants in the United States, some of which are former Ball Brothers/Ball Corporation factories.
For more general info on Saint-Gobain (worldwide operations), go to:     Saint-Gobain.com .

Verallia’s website is here:    Verallia North America .

Also, see the   Ball Brothers Glass Manufacturing Company page,
which includes a list of the 13 current factory locations within the US. (These are now [2015] Ardagh Group manufacturing facilities).

Click here to go to the Glass Bottle Marks pages (this link points to Page 5).   Other marks such as “S.G.CO.” which was used by several early companies and appear on a range of older bottles (and have no relation whatsoever to Saint-Gobain), are listed there.

Please click here to go to my Home Page.  

Comments/Replies: All comments are moderated so will not be published immediately. Because of mail volume received, and time and energy restraints, some questions may not be answered individually, especially if the subject is already addressed elsewhere on this site. This website is not intended as an appraisal service, but as a resource for background info on glass companies and the marks they used, so I usually delete "What is this bottle worth?" types of queries. Thank you very much for your patience & understanding !!