Glass Bottle Marks – 4

GLASS MANUFACTURERS’ MARKS ON BOTTLES AND OTHER GLASSWARE ~ PAGE 4

Note: for introductory and explanatory comments concerning this section of the website, please click on the “A-B” link below which points to “page one”.  Thank you!

    [ A – B ]       [ C – D ]      [ E – L ]       [ M – R ]       [ S – Z ]

 

  • M………………….Maryland Glass Corporation, Baltimore, Maryland (1907-c.1970s). Exact period of use is uncertain, but verified on base of cobalt “Milk of Magnesia” bottle from circa 1950 (see next entry). Also, a similar mark is seen on the base of certain mouth-blown amber beer bottles and an amber salve jar that look to have been made c.1880-1895, and the maker in those cases is unidentified.   In some cases this may be the mark of the Mosser Glass Company (1971-to date).  However, keep in mind that Mosser produces upscale decorative and novelty glassware, not utilitarian containers.  See “M inside a circle” and “M within a G” entries.
  • M inside a circle (on the bottom of containers, often in cobalt blue glass)………Maryland Glass Corporation, Baltimore, Maryland (1907-c.1970s).

    Circled-M, on the inside bottom of Bird & Nest salt dip made by Mosser Glass Company

    Circled-M, on the inside bottom of Bird & Nest salt dip made by Mosser Glass Company

  • M inside a circle (on tableware, novelty glass, salt dips, glass shoes, children’s mugs, decorative toothpick holders and many other types of reproduction colored glassware, typically not on utilitarian/commercial  containers)………………………….. Mosser Glass Company, Cambridge, Ohio (1971-to date). NOTE: the “M” may or may not have slightly angled vertical strokes so that the letter appears to be an upside-down “W.  Also please see “M” and “M within outline of the state of Ohio” entries, as well as the “M inside a circle” entry concerning Maryland Glass Corporation.
  • M within a G…………Maryland Glass Corporation, Baltimore, Maryland (1907-c. 1970s).  This mark is confirmed to exist on the base of a cobalt blue rectangular “2 oz” marked bottle, with vertical ribbing on the front; probably an iodine or poison bottle.  Also seen on the base of  a cobalt “Perfection Ginger Ale, Brooklandwood Springs  Company, Baltimore, MD” bottle. (Thanks to Ken Previtali for the information on the ginger ale bottle!)  The “G” is very similar in appearance to a horizontally oriented oval.  Because of it’s presence on the Brooklandwood Springs bottle, I consider this to be virtual proof that this particular mark was indeed used by Maryland, although only in rare instances as compared to their “M inside a circle” mark which was normally used.
  • M in a diamond………Unknown (Seen on base of clear prescription bottle, c.1890)
  • M in a hexagon………Metro Glass Bottle Company, Jersey City, New Jersey. Mark used c.1949-c.1981. Also with plants at Washington, PA (since 1957); Carteret, NJ (1958) and Dolton, IL. Known as the Metro Glass Division of National Dairy Products Corp. after 1956 (Kraftco after 1969). Later known as MetroPak Containers. MetroPak was bought by Ball Corporation in 1980. The Jersey City plant was closed on Nov. 13, 1981, but the other three plants continued in operation. I’m unsure of the exact chain of later events on this company. If you know, email me!
  • M in a keystone……..Metro Glass Bottle Company, Jersey City, New Jersey (Mark used c.1935-1949). See above entry.
  • M in a shield……….Monarch Glass Company, Compton, California (c.1920s). Seen on base of Puritas water bottle.
  • M within outline of the state of Ohio…………… Mosser Glass Company, Cambridge, Ohio (1971-to date). Seen on colored tableware and upscale novelty glassware. See also “M” and “M in a circle”.          midland-mark
  • M (abstract representation), shown, consisting of one stroke ( narrow rectangle) positioned against 3 other narrow rectangles (at right angles). This logo may be intended as an abstract M, but also appears something like a capital “E” with a space between the vertical stroke and the three horizontal strokes. …………. Midland Glass Company, Inc., Cliffwood, New Jersey; Terre Haute, Indiana, and Shakopee, Minnesota (1968-1984?) This mark is frequently seen on “stubby” non-returnable beer bottles of the 1970s.
  • MAINE, with number and/or letters & the word “SEAL”,  on milk bottles) ………………………………… a number of glass manufacturers made milk bottles with this type of marking, required by state law, for bottles used within the state of Maine.  See list at this milk bottle site: http://dairyantiques.com/Milk_Bottle_Marks.html
  • Mansfield Glass Works……….Mansfield Glass Works, Lockport, New York (1872-c.1909). See Lockport Glass Works entry.
  • MARVEL……………………Unknown. Reported on base of clear glass pharmaceutical/drugstore bottle. Probably a brand name used by a particular glass manufacturer for their line of prescription bottles (such as “LYRIC” by Illinois Glass).
  • MASON’S PATENT NOV 30TH 1858 ………………… Click here for a general summary of this marking, seen on fruit jars.
  • MASS (with number and/or letters & the word “SEAL”,  on milk bottles) ………………………………… a large number of glass manufacturers made milk bottles with this type of marking, required by state law, for bottles used/distributed within the state of Massachusetts.  See list at this milk bottle site: http://dairyantiques.com/Milk_Bottle_Marks.html
  • MASS GLASS CO. …………….Massachusetts Glass Company, Somerville, Massachusetts (c.1867-1871?) . This manufacturer is believed to have produced unmarked glass insulators, apparently none of which have been yet positively identified (See my page on  Insulator Manufacturers). This rare mark, which is assumed to be linked to that same company, has been reported observed on the base of a very, very small number of bottles.
  • M. B. & G.CO………Massillon Bottle & Glass Company, Massillon, Ohio (1900-1904)
  • M.B.W………………Millville Bottle Works, Millville, New Jersey (1903-1926). Bought by T. C. Wheaton Company in 1926. Made chemical and laboratory bottles.
  • McC………………..William McCully and Company, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (1841-c.1909)
  • McC & CO……………William McCully and Company, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (1841-c.1909)
  • McK in a circle…….. McKee & Company,  Jeannette, Pennsylvania (1888-1951). Seen on various items such as black glass salt shakers and other opaque glass tableware, this mark was perhaps used mostly in the 1930s and ’40s. McKee became a subsidiary of Thatcher Glass Manufacturing Company in 1951, and eventually the factory was purchased by Jeannette Glass Company in 1961. For some more information on McKee, click here.
  • M.C.G.CO……………Unknown.

    M C G Y (faint IA between G and C). Unknown British maker. (Photo courtesy of Natasha Moletta)

    M C G Y (faint IA between C and G). Unknown British maker. (Photo courtesy of Natasha Moletta)

  • M C G Y (with faint letters I A)………………Unknown. This mark appears on the base of a very dark colored ale or beer bottle from Great Britain, probably circa 1860s-1890s. Similar to the dark olive green “black glass”  ale bottles marked “C.W. & CO”. The order of the letters is assumed to be as stated, but it is possible the first letter may not be the “M”.  Also, it is not absolutely clear if the letters “C” and “G” are correctly identified, as they appear very similar. If anyone in England knows the identity of this early glass company, please advise!
  • McKee & Co…………see McKee Glass Company page.
  • McL………………..McLaughlin Glass Company, Vernon, California (1920-1935). [Note: Water bottles (and probably other types of bottles) marked with “McL” on the base also date from the 1940s and 1950s when William McLaughlin operated other, smaller factories in Vernon and Gardena, California.]  Especially well known by glass collectors for their electrical insulators, McLaughlin also produced a wide variety of bottles and other glassware.  For more information click here .
  • M C W …………….Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, St. Louis, Missouri (1867-to date). I believe most, if not all, of the bottles found with this mark are hand-blown and date from approximately the 1880-1920 period. The actual glass factory where these bottles were made is unknown, but Illinois Glass Company, Alton, IL, would be a likely source.
  • Mechanic Glass Works, Philada……………..Mechanic Glass Works, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Exact dates of operation currently uncertain, but a very scarce flask which bears this inscription appears to date from sometime in the 1845-1865 period.
  • M. F. J. and B. CO………Marion Fruit Jar & Bottle Company, Marion, Indiana (1888-1904) Fairmount & Converse, Indiana (1894-1904). Plants bought out by Ball Bros. in 1904.

    Madera Glass Company

    Madera Glass Company

  • MG, M/G, M over a G (as shown)…………..Madera Glass Company, Madera, California (1971-1990s?). Found on wine bottles. Plant is now part of Saint-Gobain Containers (Verallia).
  • M G………………..Maywood Glass Company, Compton, California (1930-1959).
  • M.G.CO……………..See this webpage on MGCO mark.
  • M.G.M.CO (monogram)…..prob. Minneapolis Glass Mnfg. Company, Minneapolis, Minnesota (c.1886).
  • M. G. W. …………..Massillon Glass Works, Massillon, Ohio (1881-1904). This mark has long been a mystery, with very little concrete evidence available pointing to any specific glassmaker. For a long time, I had posted Middletown Glass Works of Middletown, New York (1887-1891) as a possible user of the mark. However, recently it has come to my attention that the Massillon Glass Works, a factory which was later more commonly known under the firm name (operating company name) of Reed & Company,(see “R & Co” mark)  is virtually certain to be the true source of bottles which carry this mark. Virtually all MGW bottles which also carry brewery or soda bottling firm embossings on the face of the bottle are from cities located in Ohio (plus a bare handful from southern Michigan). This is very strong evidence for a glass manufacturer from that general area.  In-depth study by archaeologist/author/researcher Bill Lockhart, and, in addition, information submitted by Rob Riese, a Massillon-area bottle collector (concerning MGW-marked beer bottles found barely a few hundred feet away from the original site of the Massillon Glass Works), virtually clinch this identification once and for all. Most of the M G W bottles are export beers, of the same general type and appearance of the R&CO beers made by Reed & Company. It is very possible that the MGW mark was used for the first few years of operation, and later the R&CO mark was phased in. Furthermore, it is possible both marks were used simultaneously for some period of time.  Thanks to Bill Lockhart and Rob Riese for this update!
  • Michigan Mason (on fruit jars)……………….. Michigan Glass Company, Saginaw, Michigan (1911-1916).
  • MINN (in a triangle, along with a 1 or 2-digit number, on milk bottles) ………………………………… a number of glass manufacturers made milk bottles with this type of marking (required, for a time, by state law for bottles to be used within the state of Minnesota). Seen on the heel or the shoulder. See list at this milk bottle site: http://dairyantiques.com/Milk_Bottle_Marks.html .
  • M. J. CO. …………….Unknown (Seen on base of wax sealer fruit jar).
  • M’Kee………………S. McKee and Company,  Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Click here  for more info.
  • Mo.G.Co…………….Missouri Glass Company, St. Louis, Missouri (c.1859-1911). Seen on face of rare wax sealer fruit jar, probably dating from the 1860s or ’70s. See M.G.CO.

    Photo from "Madman", member of antiquebottles.net

    Photo from “Madman”, member of antique-bottles.net

  • Moon & Star logo, on base of clear druggist bottles (shown)……….. Unknown manufacturer, probably located somewhere in the Northeast U.S.
  • Moon logo (without star)…….see “Crescent Moon” entry.
  • Mountain Mason………..Intermountain Glass Company, Midvale, Utah (c.1930s). Brand name found embossed on fruit jars. See “IGCO (monogram) in brackets” entry.
  • M/T (Monogram)………See T/M mark.
  • M T C inside a triangle…………………Thatcher Manufacturing Company.

    MTC mark on heel of milk bottle (ebay seller 2ndstory7777).

    MTC mark on heel of milk bottle (ebay seller 2ndstory7777).

  • M T C………………Thatcher Manufacturing Company, Kane, PA; Wharton, New Jersey; other plant locations in later years (c.1904-1985). This variation is seen in the form of a large T with smaller “m” and “c” sheltered underneath the “roof” of the T, in rather plain “block” style lettering (as shown in photo). Please see Thatcher Glass page here.
  • Mutual Glass Co, Pitts……………Mutual Glass Company, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (c.1869-c.1888). Name embossed on base of a wax sealer fruit jar. This rather obscure concern made tableware as well as oil lamps, chimneys, chandeliers, fruit jars, bottles and flasks. Also known as Gallinger and Company. Date information courtesy of Jay W. Hawkins’ Glasshouses and Glass Manufacturers of the Pittsburgh Region 1795-1910 (2009) with more detailed info in that reference book.
  • M over a V, within a circle…………Vidriera Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico (1909-19??). I am not sure of the dates of use for this mark. Also, see the “V” mark, and the “V over M inside a triangle” marks.
  • 17N (or other number between 16 and 29)……………usually American Bottle Company, at their glass plant located in Newark, Ohio. On some bottles the letter may precede the number. Evidence indicates the date codes (16, for instance, is believed to indicate 1916) may have been used much earlier, as well as later —- perhaps from ABCO’s beginning in 1905, all the way up to 1929, at least on a few bottles. I have received a report that some bottles carried apparent date codes as late as 1933, several years after the former A.B.CO. plants had become part of Owens-Illinois Glass Company. See “16S”, “AB”, and “A.B.CO” entries.
  • N………………………………….Obear-Nestor Glass Company, East St. Louis, Illinois (1894-1978). Although this “N” is normally seen inside a square (see entry farther down), some bottles are seen with just a plain ‘N’, such as an amber “Winstead’s Lax-Fos” bottle. The bottle in question is machine-made, and dates from the 1910s, 1920s or 1930s. See “N in a square” page.
  • N in a circle or oval……….Obear-Nestor Glass Company, East St. Louis, Illinois (1894-1978). Mark is believed to have been used during the early years, on handblown ware, up to about 1915. See “N in a square” page.
  • N in a circle with a line underneath the N……..Northwood Glass Company, Wheeling, West Virginia (1902-1923). Mark seen on carnival and other decorative glassware. Rarely or never seen on bottles, but I’m listing the mark here for comparison with similar marks seen on bottles.
  • N in a keystone………….Newborn Glass Company, Royersford, Pennsylvania (1920-1925)
  • N in an oblong (or vertical rectangle) …………Obear-Nestor Glass Company, East St. Louis, Illinois (1894-1978). This mark was presumably used concurrently with “N in a circle” and “N in an oval”, on handblown ware up to about 1915. After 1915, on machine-made ware, the “N in a square” was instituted as their standard mark. See “N in a square” page.
  • N in a square……….Obear-Nestor Glass Company, East St. Louis, Illinois (1894-1978). For more info, see “N in a square” page.
  • N under roof Vetri Speciali S.p.AN over a somewhat “flattened” V, inside a circle, shown (upside down, this mark resembles an N under a “roof”) ………Previously unidentified, Lou Bisiecki has kindly informed me by email that this mark is used by Vetri Speciali S.p.A., Italy, at their Pergine Valsugana glass container plant.
  • N next to (or within) a star………see Newark Star Glass Works, Newark, Ohio (1873-1904). 
  • N.B.B.G.CO………….North Baltimore Bottle Glass Company, North Baltimore, Ohio (1888-1895), Albany, Indiana (1895-1900); and finally the factory operation was moved to Terre Haute, Indiana (1900-1926). Producer of a very large number of soda, mineral water and beer bottles made for many companies, especially throughout the midwest. The initials are usually found on the heel of their bottles, often with rather small, lightly embossed, inconspicuous lettering. The majority of bottles found with the NBBGCO mark date after their move to Indiana.      N B & CO amber bottle base shard
  • N B & CO. ………………..Nelson Baker & Company, Detroit, Michigan (1890-1950).  Nelson Baker was a pharmaceutical / drug manufacturing company.  N B & CO combined with Penslar Corporation in 1950.  Mark (as shown)  appears on base shard of a square amber medicine bottle, possibly circa 1900-1920, photo submitted by Jon McCormack.  Thanks Jon!
  • NC within a slightly flattened triangle (oriented with bottom side slightly longer)………….Noelle & von Campe Glashütte (Glassworks), Boffzen, Lower Saxony, Germany (Deutschland). I saw this mark on the base of an 8-ounce packer jar in October, 2012, imported to the United States.
  • N & CO………….Nuttall & Company, St. Helens, Lancashire, England. Made many types of bottles that were imported into the United States. This mark dates before 1913, when Nuttall merged with other plants to form United Glass.
  • N.C.L.CO……………Nail City Lantern Company, Wheeling, West Virginia (1877-1897). This firm was re-organized as Wheeling Stamping Company in 1897.
  • Neutraglas………….Kimble Glass Company, Vineland, New Jersey (1905-to date). Relatively recent trademark used on their borosilicate glass for scientific, pharmaceutical & industrial applications. Now known as Kimble/Kontes.
  • New Albany Glass Works (in circle on base)……..New Albany Glass Works, New Albany, Indiana (1867- c.1872).  A dark red-amber quart ale bottle is confirmed to exist with this mark on the bottom. John B. Ford & Sons, proprietors of the New Albany Glass Works, began operating in February of 1867  producing window glass, bottles and jars (according to information published in the Floyd County Gazetteer, 1868). One source (History of the Ohio Falls Cities and their Counties, 1882) give 1865 as the date of that glassmaking operation’s beginning which I believe is incorrect (although plans for forming the company were discussed as early as October 1865, according to an article in the New Albany Daily Ledger). The NAGW factory property was purchased in 1874 by Washington C. DePauw (although it had been idle for about 2 or 3 years) to became part of the Star Glass Works (established c. 1869) later known as DePauw’s American Plate Glass Works / W. C. DePauw Company. (See “Star”, “W C D” marks and Star Glass Works  webpage).
  • Newburgh Glass Co……………Newburgh Glass Company, Newburgh (New Windsor), New York (c.1867- c.1872). Also known as the “New Windsor Glass Works” in at least one source (The Telegrapher, trade newspaper, 1867). Embossing confirmed on the base of a very scarce ale bottle. Newburgh also manufactured telegraph insulators, including at least some, if not many, of the insulators marketed by L.G. Tillotson in the late 1860s.
  • New Eng. Glass Bottle Co. ………….New England Glass Bottle Company, Cambridge, Massachusetts (1827-1845) . Embossing is arranged in a circular formation along the outer base rim of a “blackglass” (very dark olive green or olive amber) ale, porter or wine bottle. (This firm is not to be confused with the New England Glass Company, also of Cambridge). This mark was suggested to be, by author & glass historian/researcher Helen McKearin, the probable earliest glassworks identification mark known on the base of an American-made bottle, possibly dating from the 1830s. However, no one really knows what year the mark was first used. I believe that another mark (but from the Pittsburgh region) might actually be a contender for “1st place”! See “W. I. & P” entry.
  • New Granite Glass Works, Stoddard, N.H………………..New Granite Glass Works, Stoddard, New Hampshire (1861-1871). Seen on flask with flag design. For more info on Stoddard Glass, see http://www.peachridgeglass.com/2012/01/staddard-glass-updated-information-from-michael-george/
  • New London Glass Works…………New London Glass Works, New London, Connecticut (1856-c.1859). Factory name seen embossed on historical flasks. This reportedly became known as “Union Glass Works” about 1859, and was probably the same factory known as “Thames Glass Works” in the 1865-1866 period.     Nadir Figueiredo S.A. mark on glass tumbler
  • NF. (N joined with upside-down L and raised dot or small “o”, see picture of mark as shown)…………………… Nadir Figueiredo S.A. , Suzano, São Paulo, Brazil, South America.  Producer of glass tableware,  especially tumblers. Illustration is showing the mark as seen on the base of an avocado green glass tumbler. Their website is www.Nadir.com.br/2010/.
  • N G CO……………….Northern Glass Company, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (1894-1896). This mark is very uncommon, but has been confirmed to exist by author/researcher Roger Peters.
  • N G W………………Northern Glass Works, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (1896-1900). Continuation of above factory. Mark is uncommon, but does exist. W.F.& S. mark (William Franzen & Son) might have been the actual mark used on much of the product from this factory during the 1896-1900 period.
  • Nuart (Nu-art)……………Imperial Glass Company, Bellaire, Ohio (1902-1984). For more info, please see the Imperial Glass Company collectors’ website:  http://www.imperialglass.org/site.htm”
  • Nucut (Nu-cut)…………….Imperial Glass Company, Bellaire, OH. Mark used circa 1911-1932, on a small percentage of their pressed glass ware. (Note: all glass with the “Nucut” mark, or other marks used by other companies including “Near Cut” or “Pres Cut” are not actually cut glass, they are properly termed “pressed glass”, i.e.  glass pressed under high pressure into an iron mold. See link above for Imperial Glass collectors’ site.
  • Numbers (numerals) on the bottom of bottles…….please click here for more information.
  • NW…………………..Northwestern Glass Company, Seattle, Washington (1931-19??). The letters in this mark may or may not be connected.      
  • NY inside a C…………………..Central New York Bottle Company, Auburn, NY (circa 1978-1980s?). Made Miller brand beer bottles. If you have information on the closing dates of the plant, please contact me!
  • N.Y.Q.& C.W.Ld…………New York Quinine & Chemical Works, Limited, Brooklyn, NY. A subsidiary of McKesson & Robbins, a drug manufacturing firm first organized in 1833. I do not know the exact year that NYQ&CW was formed, but bottles bearing these initials on the base are mouth-blown and appear to date from the 1890-1920 period. The glass factory(s) which produced the bottles are unknown.

    O inside a diamond- On "H.E. Bills Magic Relief, Bay CIty, MI" bottle (photo courtesy Taylor McBurney)

    O inside a diamond- On “H.E. Bills Magic Relief, Bay City, MI” bottle (photo courtesy Taylor McBurney)

  • O inside a diamond (shown). Unknown maker. This appears on a handmade older American bottle marked “H. E. Bills Magic Relief”, possibly circa 1890-1920.

    Qinhuangdao Fang Yuan Glass Company

    Qinhuangdao Fangyuan Glass Company

  • O inside a diamond (rhombus)……………..shown here, as seen on base of emerald green mineral water bottle, made circa 2013………………Qinhuangdao Fangyuan Glass Company,Limited, Duzhang, Funing County, Hebei Province, People’s Republic of China [Mainland] (2001-to date).  This mark might be confused with a somewhat similar logo once used by Owens-Illinois, Inc. primarily in the 1930s-1950s. However, on this modern Chinese mark, the “O” (circle) is entirely inside the diamond, not entwined or superimposed as was Owens-Illinois’ mark.  Qinhuangdao Fang Yuan Glass Company’s official trademark/logo also includes two Chinese characters (Fang Yuan) placed within the circle, but these may not appear on actual bottles. The rhombus shape may appear somewhat “flattened” horizontally (as in pic) or with all sides with 90 degree angles (i.e. an ordinary square balanced on one point).
  • O in a keystone……..Oil City Glass Bottle Company, Oil City, Pennsylvania (c.1930-1952). Also, see the oil derrick logo shown at the bottom of this page, which was the mark used by their successor company, the Oil City Glass Company (1952-1969).
  • O in a square……….Owens Bottle Company, Toledo Ohio (1911-1929), also Fairmont, WV; Clarksburg, WV, Charleston, WV and other plant locations. See the Owens Bottle Company page.
  • O with an I inside…………Owens-Illinois Glass Company  (now Owens-Illinois, Inc.), Toledo, Ohio and other plant locations.
  • O and I entwined with a diamond…….. see the Owens-Illinois Glass Company page for a number of photographs showing this very commonly encountered mark.
  • O.B.CO……………..Ohio Bottle Company, Newark Ohio (1904-1905). Short-lived merger of 3 factories. Later merged with several other plants to form the American Bottle Company.
  • Obear-Nestor………………please see “N in a square“.
  • O D ……………….Old Dominion Glass Company, Alexandria, Virginia (1901-1925)
  • OG in a circle (monogram, shown)………….Olean Glass Company, Olean, New York (1929-1942). Mark may be somewhat indistinct, with the “G” looking more like a “C” or a sideways “U”. Also reported as being found both with and without the circle.
  • olean mark Olean Glass CompanyOG (along lower heel of soda bottles, preceded and followed by various numbers)………Graham Glass Company, Evansville, Indiana, Okmulgee, Oklahoma glass plant. See Graham.
  • OGCo (monogram)……….Olean Glass Company/Works, Olean, New York (1887-1915). There were two different companies known as Olean Glass. At least on the wax sealer fruit jars which are attributed to the earlier company, this mark appears as a monogram with the letters (left to right) arranged as “G O Co”, with the “O” much larger and partially entertwined with the letter on each side.
  • O G CO……………..Olean Glass Company, Olean, New York (1929-1942). This is the second Olean Glass Company. I have no info on whether this mark has been seen in actual use, or exactly how this mark appears, if it is different than the one from the earlier company. For a confirmed Olean mark, see “OG” monogram mark.
  • O.G.W. ……………..Olean Glass Company/Works, Olean, New York (1887-1915). See above entries. NOTE: Some bottles found with this marking are products of the Oakland Glass Works, Oakland, California (early 1880s). That factory operated for only a short time and bottles with this marking are scarce. They are nearly always found in California or the western U.S.
  • O-I ……………….Owens-Illinois, Inc.
  • Oil City Glass CompanyOil derrick logo (shown)…………Oil City Glass Company, Oil City, Pennsylvania (1952-1969). Also, see “O in a keystone” mark.
  • OLEAN………………Olean Glass Company/Works, Olean, New York (1887-1915)
  • O-N………………..Obear-Nester Glass Company, East St. Louis, Illinois (1894-1978). Exact time period when this mark was used is uncertain, but a machine-made soda bottle from around 1920 carries it on the heel.  Please see “N in a a square“page,  also, “N in an oblong”, and “N in a circle” marks.
  • OP (along lower heel of soda bottles, preceded and followed by various numbers) …….. Graham Glass Company, Evansville, Indiana, this code used at their Okmulgee, Oklahoma glass plant. See Graham.
  • OS (same as above). See Graham.
  • Oval (horizontally arranged, with line drawn through longest axis, resembling a belt buckle)…………Western Glass Manufacturing Company, Valverde (Denver), Colorado (c.1900-1909)
  • OVGCO (monogram)…….Ohio Valley Glass Company, Bridgeport, Ohio (1881-1888). Seen on fruit jars. The embossing “O.V.G.CO.” which appears on glass electrical insulators is an unrelated mark which was used by the Ohio Valley Glass Company of Pleasant City, Ohio (1902-1905).
  • OWENS…………….. Owens Bottle Company, Toledo, Ohio (1919-1929) and it’s successor [after the merger with Illinois Glass Company], Owens-Illinois Glass Company (1929-to date). Mark is confirmed on a clear druggist bottle with date code “7.” (presumed to indicate 1947).  Sometimes just the “O” of “Owens” is enclosed within a square. I don’t know when this mark was first used during the OBC years, so will have to go with “1919-1929″ until further info is uncovered. I believe the mark was used up into the 1950s or ’60s by Owens-Illinois, but have no definite info on ending date.  See “O in a square”.
  • P in a circle……….Pierce Glass Company, St. Mary’s, Pennsylvania (1905-1912); Hamburg, New York (1912-1917); Port Allegany, Pennsylvania (1917-c.1980s). This factory was acquired by Indianhead Container Corporation (later merged into Ball-InCon) and is now a Saint-Gobain Containers glass plant. This mark appears on some commonly-produced medicine bottles of the early to mid-20th century, including many of the Pitcher’s Castoria, Fletcher’s Castoria, Dr. W. B. Caldwell’s bottles and others which are found quite often in dumps of the period.
  • P in a keystone……..Wightman Bottle & Glass Co, Parker’s Landing, Pennsylvania [in Knox Bottle Company group] (1932-1951)
  • P in a square……….Pine Glass Company, Okmulgee, Oklahoma (1927-1929). Maker of “Pine Mason” jars. Factory purchased by Ball Bros Glass Company in 1929, later one of their most important plants.
  • Paris…………..brand name seen on bottom of  druggist bottles, assumed to be the name assigned to a line of such bottles made by an unidentified glassmaker.
  • PAT. JULY 11, 1939 (on base of hobnail votive candleholders)……………….Crescent Glass Company, Wellsburg, West Virginia (1908-19?, re-named Brooke Glass Company, dates of operation uncertain). Please see the Hobnail Glass Votive Candle Cups webpage.
  • PAT’D APR. 23 ’78 (on bottom of tableware, such as milkglass pitchers, covered bowls, etc in the Melon pattern). Please see webpage on Atterbury & Company, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

    Patent Dec 19 1871 on Hemingray Insulators

    On CD 132 telegraph line insulator made by Hemingray

  • PATENT  DEC 19, 1871……………… as seen on glass electrical insulators. This marking positively identifies the insulator as a product of the Hemingray Glass Company. Most insulators with this marking were made between 1871 and the early 1890s.
  • Patent May 2, 1893………………marking frequently seen on glass insulators. This patent date positively identifies the insulator as a product of the Hemingray Glass Company, Muncie, Indiana. The patent was actually referring to the invention of “drip points” (“teeth” or “beading”) added to the base of most Hemingray insulators.  Millions of insulators were marked with this patent date, primarily as a marketing ploy.
  • Pawn chess piece………see Capstan Glass Company.
  • P.B.W………………Point Bottle Works Company, Rochester, Pennsylvania and Beaver Falls, PA (at second location 1899-1906). Originally known as Rochester Flint Vial and Bottle Works (1879-c.1882), later, Rochester Point Bottle Works Limited (c.1882-1906). Appears on the base of clear coffin flasks. For more detailed information on this firm, as well as many other glass companies, many highly obscure, please refer to Glasshouses & Glass Manufacturers of the Pittsburgh Region 1795-1910 (2009) by author/researcher Jay W. Hawkins.
  • P/C in duo-segmented parallelogram……….Pacific Coast Glass Works (1902-1925) and Pacific Coast Glass Company, San Francisco, California (1925-1930). This mark was introduced in 1919, and used on ware until about 1930. Source on 1919 date: Peterson (1968:49).
  • P/C in a square……..Pacific Coast Glass Works (1902-1925) and Pacific Coast Glass Company, San Francisco, California (1925-1930). This mark was used possibly as early as 1919, but was definitely in use by 1925. See other “P.C.” entries.
  • P C in a triangle……….Pacific Coast Glass Works (1902-1925) and Pacific Coast Glass Company, San Francisco, CA (1925-1930). Mark was first used in either 1919 or 1925.
  • P.C………………..Pacific Coast Glass Works (1902-1925) and it’s successor Pacific Coast Glass Company, San Francisco, CA (1925-1930). The PC mark probably dates from either 1919, or 1925, and on up to 1930.
  • P.C.G.W…………….Pacific Coast Glass Works, San Francisco, CA (1902-1925). See “P.C.” marks.
  • P.D.& CO………..Parke Davis & Company, Detroit, Michigan (1875-to date). Parke Davis was (and is) known for an extensive line of pharmaceutical products. I’m including this mark because it’s frequently encountered and might be mistaken for a glass manufacturer’s mark. I do not know what glass company(s) made bottles for Parke Davis, but no doubt many different companies made bottles for them over the years. Most of the bottles with the P.D.& Co. marking probably date before 1930.       PETTICOAT embossing on H.G.CO. CD 145 beehive insulator
  • Petticoat (embossed word on glass electrical insulators) …………… a handful of glass manufacturers made insulators bearing this marking. The great majority of insulators so marked were made by Hemingray Glass Company. The term “petticoat insulator” in these instances, is merely referring to any of various styles of insulators with one (or more) “inner skirts”. That is, by looking upward into the base, an additional, inner “ring” or “curved wall” of glass can be seen.  The most popular styles with this marking would be the “H.G.CO. // PETTICOAT” insulators made by Hemingray, especially the CD 145 and CD 162 styles.
  • P.G.Co. …………..Peerless Glass Company, Long Island City, New York (c. 1920-1932).  The mark “P.G.Co” is illustrated, in a circular orientation on the “northwest” corner (10:00 to 12:00 position) of bottle bases,  in a catalog page from an Owens-Illinois Glass Company bottle catalog / circular, undated but evidently from the early 1930s.   Also, see next entry.
  • P.G.CO……………..Uncertain (Seen on early clear handblown prescription flask, c. 1900). Might be a product of the Pennsylvania Glass Company, Anderson, Indiana (1888-1915). They were heavy producers of flint prescription ware. That company moved to Dunbar, West Virginia and operated there from 1915-1922.
  • P G & Co………………Unknown.
  • P.G.W………………Pacific Glass Works, San Francisco, California (1862-1876)
  • Philada Glass Works/Burgin & Sons………………Philadelphia Glass Works, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (1844-1910). Operated under more than one proprietorship, this factory started as Burgin & Pearsall in 1844, became Burgin and Sons in 1853. Most commonly encountered bottles with this marking are the squat sodas that appear to date from approximately the 1855-1875 period.
  • Pitcher’s Castoria………..for more information, please see page on Fletcher’s Castoria bottles.
  • Plus sign (+)………………………….see “X” entry.
  • PORT……………….Port Glass Company, Muncie, Indiana (1890-1902); Belleville, Illinois (1902-1904). Plants bought by Ball Brothers Glass Manufacturing Company in 1904, closed in 1910.   Many fruit jars were made at this factory.
  • POSTAL (marking seen on glass electrical insulators)……….most of these were made by Brookfield Glass Company for the Postal Telegraph Company (1886-1945) and typically date from the 1900-1920 period.
  • Potter & Bodine………..Potter & Bodine, Bridgeton, New Jersey (1855-1863). This was one of the firm names under which the Bridgeton Glass Works operated. Later became known as the Cohansey Glass Works. “Potter & Bodine” mark is seen on fruit jars and on the base of cylinder whiskey bottles.
  • Pres Cut (Pres-Cut)…………………Trademark / Brand name assigned to a line of upscale glassware patterns produced by McKee Glass Company, Jeannette, Pennsylvania. This marking appears on the base of many of these pieces, generally, most of it made during the period of c.1903-1920.   The patterns, known collectively as the “Tec” patterns, made use of elaborate “imitation cut glass” designs, similar in general appearance to the finely-crafted cut glass that was very popular during that time frame.  The 18 pattern names for this line include: Aztec, Bontec, Carltec, Doltec, Fentec, Glentec, Martec, Nortec, Plutec, Plytec, Quintec, Rotec, Sextec, Startec, Toltec, Valtec, Wiltec, and Yutec.  They are very ornate, and often confused with each other. Here is a webpage with illustrations of at least one piece in each pattern: http://glassandpotterysellers.org/newsletter/17_aug2004.htm  Also, please see next entry. Also see “Nucut”.
  • Prescut (note this is one word, not separated by a dash, as above entry) more accurately called “Early American Prescut”, this is an unrelated, later tableware glass pattern made by Anchor Hocking Glass Company, beginning in 1960, and still in production as late as 1999.   It is extremely common and many pieces are very inexpensive. They are usually not marked. A very similar pattern is called “Oatmeal”. Much of this ware was originally distributed as free giveaways as part of sales product promotions, especially in the 1960s and 1970s. For more information on this pattern, written by Cathy Linehan, see http://www.ndga.net/articles/gmeapc1.php.  Glass author/researcher Gene Florence discusses and pictures many of the pieces in this pattern in his reference book Collectible Glassware from the ’40s, ’50s and ’60s.  Note: this line is unrelated to the much earlier “PRES-CUT” line (two words) produced by McKee Glass Company, discussed in the above entry.
  • Putnam…………….Lyndeborough Glass Company, South Lyndeboro, New Hampshire (1866-1886), embossed on the base of “Trademark Lightning” fruit jars. HOWEVER, this mark was also used on large numbers of similar “Lightning-style closure” jars made later by a number of other glass companies. The mark is also reported on early mouthblown amber beer bottles circa late 1800s or early 1900s. NOTE: There are also reproduction “Lightning” style jars with the marking “PUTNAM 227″ on the base. These are relatively modern, made of amber glass, and were evidently made in Asia, likely dating from sometime in the 1960s-1980s period. (Assuming these were made from an old Lightning jar mold sold to a company in Asia, there exists the possibility that authentic Lightning jars with the number 227 do exist and may be found occasionally…….although a close inspection would likely show them to be old production by subtle clues of age such as general characteristics of the glass, the presence of high-point base wear, besides being made of the typical aqua “bottle glass” most lightning jars are found in).
  • Putnam Glass Works, Zanesville, O. ……………….Putnam [Flint] Glass Works, Zanesville, Ohio (c.1852-c.1871). Marking is arranged in a circle, and appears on the base of a wax sealer fruit jar. This factory went through many business name/owner changes and the exact period when these jars were made is uncertain.
  • Pyrex……………………..Corning Glass Company/Works, Corning, New York (1875-to date).
  • Q ……………..Unknown. Reported on base of drugstore bottles, principally from northern Illinois area.
  • Quarrier, Ott & Co……………Quarrier, Ott & Company, Wheeling, (West) Virginia (1850-early 1860s?). One of the business firm names that operated the Union Glass Works of Wheeling. This marking has been confirmed on the base of a scarce cylinder whiskey bottle.                       Rosendahl, Copehagen, Denmark
  • R (highly stylized, as shown) , this mark is seen on upscale tableware including tumblers………… Rosendahl, Copenhagen (København), Denmark (Danmark), 1984- to date.  This mark appears, when turned sideways, as somewhat similar to a capital “C” or “G”.  (Thanks to Elizabeth Bruhmuller for photo and attribution).
  • R in a circle……..Unknown.
  • R in a keystone……..Rosso Wholesale Glass Dealers, Inc., Port Vue, Pennsylvania (1969-to date). This mark is seen on glass “hen-on-nest” covered dishes and other decorative items. Rosso (strictly a wholesaler, not a manufacturer) has glassware made for him by various glass companies, including Mosser, Summit, Fenton and L. E. Smith.

    R in a triangle mark used by Reed. This bottle base has 1949 date code to right.

    R in a triangle mark used by Reed. This bottle base has 1949 date code to right.

  • R in a triangle……..Reed Glass Company, Rochester, New York (c.1927-1956). The 1927-1956 date range is given by Julian Toulouse in Bottle Makers and their Marks (1971).  However, I received a report from Taylor McBurney who confirms this mark on an older, square handmade bottle (prob. circa 1890-1915) so, assuming Reed was the maker of that bottle, they apparently used the “R in a triangle” much earlier than stated by Toulouse.  The “R in a triangle” might also indicate another, unrelated and unidentified company. See “Reed”, Rochester Glass Works, “C-H” mark.

    Richards Packaging. Pic courtesy of Irena Shein.

    Richards Packaging  (Pic courtesy of Irena Shein)

  • R (odd-looking trademark, sometimes may look like either an R or a K, with a bottle-shaped “notch” extending downward from the upper right side, shown)……………….. Richards Packaging, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada. Richards is a distributor of glass and plastic containers, and has a number of distributing locations scattered throughout Canada and the United States.  Most of their glass containers with this mark were made in China, and to some extent, some other Asian countries. This particular mark is often (but not always) accompanied by a four-digit number, and dates after 2005. Earlier containers, with their earlier trademark,  an “RP” (see RP mark)  date after 1982, and were made in Taiwan. Their website can be found at www.RichardsPackaging.com .
  • R & CO (on the bottom of beer bottles)………………Reed & Company, Massillon, Ohio (1881-1904).   See this page for more info.
  • Rawleigh’s (W.T.Rawleigh’s / Freeport, Ill ) ……………… bottles with his marking are quite frequently found throughout the United States. Please see this page for more information.
  • Ravenna Glass Works…………Ravenna Glass Works, Ravenna, Ohio (1857-1866). Full name is found embossed on the face of fruit jars and whiskey flasks. Info on exact dates of operation courtesy of Brian Gray.

    RC inside circle~Robert Coleman. On base of decorative iridescent 2-handled blown bottle. (Photo courtesy Carey Hamilton)

    RC inside circle~Robert Coleman. On base of decorative iridescent 2-handled blown bottle. (Photo courtesy Carey Hamilton)

  • RC inside a circle (shown)…………….Robert Coleman, independent glass artist who specializes in handblown iridescent (carnival glass) pieces, some with an “art deco” influence.   Vases, bottles, bowls, etc are found with this mark on the bottom. I’m not sure on years of production, but perhaps 1990s to present. If you have more info, please contact me!
  • Reed……………….F.E.Reed Glass Company (or Reed Glass Company), Rochester, New York (c.1899-1956). See Rochester Glass Works.
  • REIP (or R  E  I  P)………………as  seen on base of crown-top blue-aqua tooled lip “export beer” style bottle, probably made circa 1895-1915.  Unknown. (Reported by Lee Taylor).  Could be either initials, or an actual surname for a brewer or bottling company?
  • REX (in cursive script)…………Obear Nester Glass Company, East St.Louis, Illinois (1894-1978).  Mark used from 1896 to circa 1910?. Trademark used by Obear-Nestor, occasionally seen on base of clear prescription bottles. Please see “N in a square” page.
  • R.G.& B.CO……………Rhodes Glass & Bottle Company, Massillon, Ohio (1901-c.1919). This mark and the following variation is seen rather frequently on bases of amber and aqua beer bottles from cities in OH, PA, IN, MI, WI, and MD that I am aware of, and probably other states as well. An obscure company which is virtually unknown to bottle collectors, nevertheless quite a number of bottles were manufactured over a period of almost two decades. The name of the company seems to have changed slightly at some unknown time during it’s history, with the “&” being omitted. Perhaps future research will shed more light on this firm.
  • R.G.B.CO………Same as above. Presumably a variation of the above mark.
  • R.G.CO……………..Root Glass Company, Terre Haute, Indiana (1901-1932). Mark used by Root in the early years (1901-c.1909). Toulouse (Bottle Makers and their Marks, 1971)  stated these initials stood for Renton Glass Company, Renton, Washington (1907-1911). However, the “R.G.CO.” mark which was used by Renton likely appears only on certain bottles from the West Coast. I do not believe any of the many Midwestern-origin soda and beer bottles seen with the “R.G.CO.” marking originate from Renton.  See Root Glass Company page.
  • R.G.W. ……………..Possibly Ravenna Glass Works, Ravenna, Ohio (1857-1866). Seen on base of wax sealer fruit jars. (Dates courtesy of research by Brian Gray).
  • R.I.  (with number or letter and the word “SEAL”, on milk bottles) ……………………………………  several glass manufacturers made milk bottles with this type of marking, required by law for bottle used / distributed within the state of Rhode Island.  See list at this milk bottle site: http://dairyantiques.com/Milk_Bottle_Marks.html
  • R.I.B……………..Unknown. (Rhode Island Bottling Company??) Seen on base of beer bottle, this mark could stand for either a brewing company, bottling company or a glass bottle manufacturer.
  • R.I.P……………Unknown.
  • H.Ricketts & CO………….H.Ricketts & Company Glassworks, Bristol, England.  Seen on early blackglass bottles. Bottles with this marking date from 1821 to about 1853. This is probably the earliest type of bottle carrying an embossed glass factory identification mark on the base.
  • RM (monogram)………..Unknown. Reported to me as seen on beer or soda bottle base shard.
  • Robinson, Geo. W. (Geo. W. Robinson / NO. 75 / MAIN ST W. VA.)……………………embossed marking on face of strapside flask. Made at the North Wheeling Glass Works (dba Geo. W. Robinson), Wheeling, West Virginia (c. 1860s- c.1910).  Exact time frame when these flasks were made is open to question, but they may date from sometime during the 1865-1875 period. Some sources (i.e. McKearin) indicate the works were in business as early as 1860. But in the earlier years window glass was the predominate product; later on they switched to making primarily bottles.  George W. Robinson was the owner/manager of the works sometime in the 1860s/1870s. An 1879 reference (History of the Pan-Handle, published by J. A. Caldwell) mentions “Mr. Robinson” was involved in early years, but indicates the works had just recently began operating with a new company (group of owners) under the name “North Wheeling Glass Company”, for a “short time”, meaning perhaps since 1877 or 1878(?).   The last mention I can find of this operation is from c. 1910 when young boys were striking at the factory.
  • Rochester Glass Wks………………………Rochester Glass Works, Rochester, New York (1862-1908). Alice Creswick in The Fruit Jar Works (1995:273) shows this chronology for the Rochester Glass Works and succeeding firms, evidently from city directory listings researched by either herself or Dick Roller: Rochester Glass Works (1862-1881); Kelley & Co. (1882-1885); Kelley, Reed & Co. (1886-1887); Eugene Reed & Co. (1888-1889); E. P. Reed & Co. (1890-1894); Rochester Glass Works (1895-1898); F. E. Reed Glass Company/Works (1899-1900); Rochester Glass Works (1901-1908); F. E. Reed & Co. (or F.E.Reed Glass Co.) (1909-1927); Reed Glass Co. (1927-1946); and Reed Glass Co., Inc. (1947-1956). Several marks were used at various times by this factory, and the exact period of time during which each mark was used is not completely certain at this time. Known marks include “Reed”,  “F.E.R.”,  “F.E.R.G.Co.”,  “R in a triangle”,  and “Rochester Glass Wks”. Some bottles are known with the marking “Rochester NY Glass Works” embossed in a circle on the base. The full factory name could conceivably have been embossed on bottles dating from anytime within the 1862-1908 timeframe.    After a time of inactivity, the Reed Glass Company  plant at Rochester was purchased by Castle-Hanson Corporation in 1959, and the “C-H” mark was used for some period of time thereafter. Later, Leone Industries, based in Bridgeton, New Jersey, purchased the plant and their “L in an unconnected square” mark was used on ware produced at Rochester as well as Bridgeton. Exact dates of later operations of this factory are unclear. (See “R in a triangle”, “C-H”, and “L in an unconnected square” marks). Rock hammer mark
  • Rock hammer,  scythe or anchor-like symbol inside rounded vertical triangle (triangle vaguely reminiscent of teardrop shape) as shown in pic……………..this glassmaker’s mark seen on base of dark forest/emerald green Jägermeister liqueur bottle. Uncertain, possibly a glass manufacturer in Germany (Deutschland)?  If you know what firm used this logo, please contact me, and I will give you credit for the submission!
  • Ron Ray 1991 (or other year, hand-etched on base of art glass bird paperweights)……………………Phoenix Studios, Fayetteville, Arkansas. These birds, usually in blue glass, but occasionally in other colors, are similar to the pieces made by Terra Studios, also of Fayetteville. (All birds marked “Leo Ward” on the base are products of Terra Studios.)
  • ROOT……………….see this page: Root Glass Company, Terre Haute, Indiana (1901-1932).
  • RP (often with 3-digit number) on the base…………………..Richards Packaging, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada.  This”RP” mark dates after 1982, and indicates production in Taiwan (by unidentified glass factory(s)  for Richards. Richards instituted their later odd-looking “R” mark in 2005 (as shown, above on this page).

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32 Responses to Glass Bottle Marks – 4

  1. Yogi Bear says:

    I know my bottle is around 1900 or so, as it’s a tooled crown, and I know that it is a Grand Rapids Brewing Co. bottle, but I do not know what the “203 / P” on the base means? Could the 203 be some sort of mold? And the P… could that be like what s often seen on the base of milks– the letter being the first letter of the dairy (or in this case brewery) owner’s last name? I know I’ve commented with several questions, but I’m curious on mine. Here is an image of the base of my bottle, which I pulled out of the Muskegon River during the clean-up this year:
    http://www.antique-bottles.net/forum/download.axd?file=2;656098&filename=Muskegon%20River%20Clean-up%20finds%20009.JPG
    It is blurry, for which I apologize.

  2. Rick says:

    Hello David
    A great site! I am the last member of the family (Grandfather A.F.Reed) to work for Reed Glass in Rochester; NY. Not too much in print these days. Was there at shut down in 1956. Videoed the destruction of the old plant, including dynamiting the silos years later when Leone was running it. I am lucky enough to have some ware with the company “L” on the bottom.
    Good luck, and nice work.

  3. Henry Little says:

    Just want to say that this is a great website..Thanks!

  4. Toni Moriarty says:

    Hi I have an aqua colored canning jar-bottle which reads RED( superimposed over a key)MASON’S PATENT NOV. 30th 1858. On the bottom of the bottle are the symbols XXII I measured the bottle and it is 64 oz.(Could you identify this for me?

    • David says:

      Hi Toni,
      You have an example of one of several types of fruit jars made by Giles Clough Glass Company (c.1896-1898) or it’s successor Redkey Glass Company (1898-c.1908), located in Redkey, Indiana. Yours would be the 1/2 gallon size. Dates of operation info is from The Fruit Jar Works, Volume 1, page 183, by Alice Creswick, 1995.
      Hope this helps!
      David

  5. Karen Brown says:

    David–Thank you so much for all the details. As you can tell, I”m rather new to this tho I have been collecting glass since I was a kid (1970). I will keep in touch and now on to your other response. I really appreciate your help.
    Best.
    –Karen.

  6. clay says:

    Hi there i recently found a Bromoseltzer emerson co. Toront ont. Bottle while metal detecting, it has the number 2 on the underside. and if the seam goes over the lip of the top it is post 1900???

    • David says:

      Hello Clay,
      This is one of the Bromo-Seltzer bottle types that were sold/distributed primarily in Canada. Emerson Drug Company had a “branch” location in Toronto, besides the main business headquarters located in Baltimore MD.
      The number “2” is a mold number, and can give no information on age. If the vertical mold seams go completely up to (and/or over) the top of the lip, the bottle is indeed machine-made. (If the seams ‘fade out’ before reaching the top, the bottle was handmade). However, regardless of what some books and websites may imply, there was NOT a quick, clear-cut changeover from handblown to machine-made bottles. The first fully automatic bottle machine (ABM) was not in operation until 1903, invented by Michael J. Owens. For a period of quite a number of years after 1903 there was a gradual transition to machine-made production of bottles. In general, the more prosperous glass companies switched over to the new methods more rapidly than some of the smaller, less financially positioned, less-well known glass bottle producers. Some hand-blown bottles were produced as late as the 1920s, even 1930s in some instances. To state “post 1900″ is a greatly over-simplified generalization. That date range is used to classify ebay bottle auctions, but is not strictly accurate.
      All that can be said is that your bottle definitely dates after 1903, but more likely was made sometime after c.1910. Without seeing the exact style, it would be hard to make a guess on age.

      Best regards,
      David

  7. Karen Brown says:

    David–
    I have a clear-glass bottle that looks like an old medicinal bottle. At the bottom of the neck, it reads: 3iv. The characters are all the same size. The “3” almost looks like a cursive capital “Z” or an overstrike with a top of the “3” part of the completed “3”. Thank you for your assist on this.
    Karen.

    • David says:

      Hi Karen,
      The weird-looking “3” (with an extra angled stroke or “z” on the top) is a symbol meaning “ounce”, or more accurately, “apothecary troy ounce”. This symbol was frequently placed on glass druggist/pharmacy (prescription) bottles, and seems to be especially common on the upper face area of “generic” clear glass bottles of the circa 1900-1940 era. (I will assume your bottle dates from that period, but it could be more recent). The bottles were usually used to contain liquids, such as cough syrup and other liquid prescription medicines. I believe the symbol is still used on some druggist bottles even up to the present day.
      The symbol is followed by the number of ounces (in lower-case Roman numerals), for instance 3iii equals “3 troy ounces”, 3iv equals “4 troy ounces”. Btw, 12 troy ounces equal one troy pound (not 16 ounces as in the avoirdupois ounce which is in more standard use in the US). Much more detailed information on the apothecaries’ system of weights and measures can be found on a page from Wikipedia, here: Apothecaries system of weights and measures.

      I hope this will be of help,
      ~David

      • Roger Ritter says:

        David: I believe you’ve just solved a mystery for me. A couple of weeks ago, I found a clear glass pint bottle featuring the “weird-looking” 3 and a smaller xvi next to it. The bottle has a rusted, but still intact metal snap cap. On the base, (which is oval) is a number 3 followed by a square with an O or zero in it, and then a 5. I found it not far from an old hunting camp built in 1925. Because it was a hunting camp, I thought surely it must have contained alcohol. I am going to place the metal cap in a reverse electrolysis solution to see if some of the rust can safely be removed. If it was cough syrup, it likely had alcohol it. (for those cold, damp days on the hunting trail) –Roger Ritter

        • David says:

          Hi Roger,
          Glad to hear you found my site to be useful! There’s no telling what may have been in the bottle, but it could have been some type of medicine, or an alcoholic-based liquid of some sort. The bottle might have been re-used (re-filled) for use on a hunting trip, so perhaps not with the original contents. Of course, the “O in a square” shows it was made by Owens Bottle Company, and likely dates sometime between 1911 and 1929. Thanks for writing~

          David

  8. Karin says:

    We found a bottle with what looks like an 8 or a B in a circle/oval shape with two small triangles, one above and one below the circle/ oval. Anyone have any ideas what this is? It looks to be a whiskey bottle(?)

  9. glb7757 says:

    Hi, I have a coke bottle ,property of Coca-Cola bottling co. from Colorado springs, pueblo marked with a plain embossed W in center bottom..I think it stands for works, but can’t determine where the bottling co. was. It was a design patent pending,and design being like that of bottles in other Colorado bottles I’ve seen from Denver and Salida.Does anyone know anything about these bottles?

  10. Hilary says:

    Hi Jaime
    Sorry don’t know about that bottle, but when I do some research into mine, I will keep a look out :)

  11. jaime hobbs says:

    I found a bottle with the word NOXON down the side and on the bottom. clear glass. Haven’t found anything online to say where it was from. Any ideas??

    • David says:

      Hi Jaime,
      I’m sure it is referring the same “NOXON” brand metal polish, a product still sold today, but no doubt an older style container. I really don’t know anything about your bottle or how old it is. I saw an example of one of the older Noxon bottles on ebay. Just guessing, that one looked like a circa 1960s or 1970s bottle, but if there is no glass makers’ mark, date code or other info on a particular bottle, it is hard to pin down a specific date for one of those bottles.
      Take care, David

  12. julie says:

    I found a dropper bottle with the dropper still intact on the beach…embossed bottom shows the following – flag with the letter p. And words re pat with a letter number combo. Still some gooey liquid inside. Amber color, 5 sides. Have researched for many hours…not a clue. Any help is much appreciated.

    • David says:

      Hi Julie,
      (To readers of this comment section, I answered directly by email). Will recap here:. In a nutshell, this bottle is marked with “RE 19520″ and a “P inside a flag” logo. A search of the US patent records, courtesy Google Patents, brings this up:
      http://www.google.com/patents/USRE19520?printsec=drawing&dq=19520++bottle&ei=4199UcfwHMmsrgGup4DgBA#v=onepage&q=19520%20%20bottle&f=false.
      The patented invention actually referred to the dropper “mechanism” inside the bottle, not the glass bottle itself.
      This type of bottle was made in large numbers by Owens-Illinois, and probably other glass companies, although this example has no glassmakers’ mark. I don’t know what the “P in a flag” signifies. Perhaps a trademark used by an unidentified drug company? If any readers have more information on this, please let us know!
      David

  13. Mikey says:

    Thank You David ; )

    Mikey

  14. Ken Wall says:

    I have a bottle with “R & C O” , and the number “12” on the bottom. It’s 11-1/2″ tall, but I’m not sure if it is an “export” bottle or not. Any info you can provide is much appreciated.

    Thanks, Ken

  15. AMAZING RESOURCE! THANK YOU

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  17. Mikey says:

    I have a bottle that looks like a early purple tabasco bottle, accept it has a ring on the neck 4 3/8 inch tall, M.B./Mfg.Co on the bottom , it has been sold in the past as a tabasco bottle ,but I am sure it is not without new iberia or McIlhenny on it , any ideas ?

    thanks Mikey ; )

    • David says:

      Hello Mikey,
      I really don’t know much about the early Tabasco sauce bottles or any other very similar types that might have been “look-alike” brands. Not sure what the M.B. Mfg. Co might stand for. Perhaps a reader/collector that sees your post might know, and can send in some info for us?
      Thanks for writing!
      David

  18. Thomas Jones says:

    Here’s an interesting summary of the Emerson Drug Co. and Maryland Glass Co. (makers of Bromo-Seltzer bottles). The summary indicates that the Maryland Glass Co. was formed by partners of the Emerson Drug Co. to make its Bromo bottles (not to mention bottles for other companies). Just an FYI.

    http://scripophily.net/emdrugcomofb.html

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