L.G.CO. mark on antique glass bottles & jars

The  L.G.CO.  mark on antique glass bottles and jars

Several bottle manufacturing factories used this mark, which has created some confusion for bottle collectors and archaeologists trying to properly attribute specimens.      Those factories include:

1)  Lindell Glass Company, St. Louis, Missouri (1875-1890),  the mark is most commonly seen on the base of “export style” beer bottles, but also on wax sealer fruit jars, and on the lower heel area of some blobtop style soda bottles.  No doubt several other types of bottles or flasks with the L.G.Co. mark are from Lindell, most of which are found in the St. Louis and surrounding area.  Lindell made very large quantities of beer bottles throughout their years in business, along with several other glass bottle manufacturers in the St. Louis area.  The mark as seen on the base of the beer bottles is typically accompanied by a mold number or “shop number”.  On fruit jars, a letter (or letters) may be present, embossed directly below the mark.

Some of the other glassmakers of that general time period who made beer bottles of this type include Mississippi Glass Company (M. G. CO.), Frederick Heitz Glass Works (F. H. G. W.),  Illinois Glass Company (I. G. CO.) and Adolphus Busch Glass Manufacturing Company (A.B.G.M.Co.).

L.G.CO. bottle, typical mark arrangement of Lindell Glass Company, St. Louis

L. G. CO. export-style beer bottle, typical mark as seen on Lindell Glass Company, St. Louis product.

"L G CO / CF" mark on base of yellow-green wax sealer fruit jar made by Lindell Glass Company, Saint Louis, MO.

“L G Co / C F” mark on base of yellow-green wax sealer fruit jar made by Lindell Glass Company, Saint Louis, MO.

L.G.Co. "pint" size beer bottle, Lindell Glass Company, St. Louis.

L.G.Co. / 15 “pint” size beer bottle, Lindell Glass Company, St. Louis.

Lindell Glass Company - pint beer bottle base, heavily patinated.

Lindell Glass Company – pint beer bottle base, heavily patinated.

Lyndeborough Glass Company - L G CO mark

Lyndeborough Glass Company , South Lyndeboro, New Hampshire – base of amber “cylinder whiskey” bottle, pic by unidentified ebay seller

2) Lyndeborough Glass Company (often spelled Lyndeboro), South Lyndeborough, New Hampshire (1866-1888),  with the mark seen on cylinder whiskey bottles,  whiskey flasks and other types of bottles.  The “L.G.CO.” marking on Lyndeborough flasks is usually arranged in a circular formation, or with the “L.G.” and the “CO.” at opposite ends of the base with the circular mold seam “button” between them.  Most of these flasks are found in the Northeastern states of the US.  The picture here shows the base of a cylinder whiskey-type bottle. (Photo of example posted on ebay).

Also, concerning later period machine-made bottles in clear glass:

3) Lamb Glass Company, Mt. Vernon, Ohio (c.1920-1964?)  can now be confirmed as the source of milk bottles marked “L G CO / 52” (See entry on L-52 mark).  These appear to be from the 1920s-1940s period. Lamb Glass also (to a much lesser extent)  made some other types of jars including “packer ware” product jars, typically for food items sold in retail stores.

LGCO / 52 marking on base of wide-mouth packer jar made by Lamb Glass Company, Mt. Vernon, Ohio.

LGCO / 52 marking on base of wide-mouth packer jar made by Lamb Glass Company, Mt. Vernon, Ohio.

Jeffrey Giarde, in his comprehensive reference book on milk bottles, stated that this mark was likely that of Liberty Glass Company, Sapulpa, Oklahoma, but I believe this to be incorrect.

Another factory that has been confirmed to be the source of some, if not many, milk bottles marked “L.G.CO.” was….

4)Lockport Glass Company, Lockport, New York (1900-1919).  An extant catalog proves this to be true. The initials are often accompanied by a single digit number, such as a “1”.

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William Brantley, in A Collector’s Guide to Ball Jars (1975), stated that Loogootee Fruit Jar Company, Loogootee, Indiana (1901-1904) produced wax sealers with the “L.G.CO.” basemark, but I haven’t been able to find any evidence to back that up.  In any case, the initials do not correspond exactly to their official company name. My own opinion is that all L.G.CO.-marked wax sealer jars are products of Lindell. Other wax sealers with a nearly identical profile (a slightly more angular shoulder and a taller neck area) are found which are marked “LINDELL GLASS CO.” on the base.

Note: I’m aware of absolutely no evidence that the Louisville Glass Works ever used this mark, as Julian Toulouse wrote in Bottle Makers and Their Marks (1971).

Please click here to return to the Glass Bottle Marks, page two. Several other similar marks are listed there, including “L G W”, L-52  and L-G.

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